Is the UK feeling the heat from their anti-British 'MUSLIMS FIRST' MULTI-CULTURAL policies?

Suddenly the UK is taking a more hawkish stance on their domestic Muslim problem. Perhaps they’re getting a backlash from British citizens who don’t like the policies of political correctness and multi-culturalism that have led to situations as posted below:

And here’s why Great Britain was not included in my post about Europe’s growing anti-Muslim backlash


UK Anti-terror code ‘would alientate most Muslims: Draft strategy brands thousands as extremists.

The government is considering plans that would lead to thousands more British Muslims being branded as extremists, the Guardian has learned. The proposals are in a counterterrorism strategy which ministers and security officials are drawing up that is due to be unveiled next month.

Some say the plans would see views held by most Muslims in Britain being classed by the government as extreme.

According to a draft of the strategy, Contest 2 as it is known in Whitehall, people would be considered as extremists if:

• They advocate a caliphate, a pan-Islamic state encompassing many countries.

• They promote Sharia law.

• They believe in jihad, or armed resistance, anywhere in the world. This would include armed resistance by Palestinians against the Israeli military.

• They argue that Islam bans homosexuality and that it is a sin against Allah.

• They fail to condemn the killing of British soldiers in Iraq or Afghanistan.

Contest 2 would widen the definition of extremists to those who hold views that clash with what the government defines as shared British values. Those who advocate the wider definition say hardline Islamist interpretation of the Qur’an leads to views that are the root cause of the terrorism threat Britain faces. But opponents say the strategy would brand the vast majority of British Muslims as extremists and alienate them even further.

The Guardian has also learned of a separate secret Whitehall counterterrorism report advocating widening the definition of who is considered extremist. Not all in Whitehall agree with the proposals and one official source said plans to widen the definition were “incendiary” and could alienate Muslims, whose support in the counterterrorism effort is needed. There were also fears it could aid the far right.


Those considered extreme would not be targeted by the criminal law, but would be sidelined and denied public funds. Ed Husain, of the Quilliam Foundation thinktank, said the root causes of terrorism were extremist views, even if those advocating the views did not call for violence.

UK Guardian

Well, it’s a start. But is it too little too late?


 

 

Europe’s anti-Muslim Backlash: anti-muslim-backlash-around-the-world-sees-big-swing-to-the-right

 

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