It's HARDER TO TRACK TERRORISTS within the U.S. than it is overseas

Technology that tracks millions of 911 calls from cell phones is being deployed in Middle Eastern and Asian-Pacific countries to track terror suspects — but Democrat-imposed obstacles prevent its widespread usage here.

Critics say this hampers authorities from tracking suspected terrorists and other dangerous criminals on American soil.

Location intelligence, or LOCINT, lets investigators locate a cell phone within 50 meters — meaning if a suspect is carrying a cell phone and authorities know his number, they can follow his “digital footprint” wherever he goes.

Had the technology been in use during the terror attacks in Mumbai in November, authorities could have used it to identify every cell phone operating in the vicinity of the attacks, potentially cutting off the terrorists’ main line of communication.

LOCINT’s inventor, a Pennsylvania-based company named TruePosition, says the system could also prove vital in investigating a terror bombing in which a device is triggered by a call or text message originating from a mobile phone. Location intelligence, or LOCINT, lets investigators locate a cell phone within 50 meters — meaning if a suspect is carrying a cell phone and authorities know his number, they can follow his “digital footprint” wherever he goes.

But the U.S. Constitution prevents LOCINT from being used unchecked in the United States. In many cases, law enforcers must obtain a judge’s warrant before pinpointing the location of a cell phone or tracking its owner.

“Where federal agents and prosecutors seek to obtain such information on a prospective basis, the Justice Department’s Criminal Division recommends that they obtain a warrant.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“In today’s world of rapidly expanding technology, law enforcement must be afforded the tools to perform their duties in real time, particularly in those instances where there is an imminent risk to human life,” McCaleb said.”Where federal agents and prosecutors seek to obtain such information on a prospective basis, the Justice Department’s Criminal Division recommends that they obtain a warrant based on probable cause. “GPS doesn’t work well in urban areas and it works very poorly in indoor environments.” “When life is at stake and every minute counts, GPS is just not the right technology.”

Meanwhile, LOCINT continues to operate in Middle Eastern and Asia-Pacific nations where no legal restrictions exist for tracking cell phone signals. Citing security concerns, company officials declined to specify which countries currently use the technology.

“They are countries extremely concerned with security,” (Unlike us)

U.S. military officials in Iraq and Afghanistan did not reply to requests for comment on the use of cell phone tracking there, but a source close to the matter told FOXNews.com that the practice is widely used.

“In Iraq and Afghanistan, I see [cell phone tracking technology] used all the time,” according to the source who requested anonymity due to not being authorized to speak on the matter. “I see it being used as often as a helicopter. But [military officials] don’t talk about electronic warfare, even if it’s widely used.”

FOX NEWS

Obambi doesn’t want us bothering the nice terrorists in the U.S. who are peacefully planning their next attack on this country. After all, terrorists are mothers and fathers, too, just ask Rosie O’Dumbell.

 

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