MUSLIM OPPOSITION is why the Olympic Committee denied moment of silence for 40th anniversary of 11 Israeli athletes slaughtered by Palestinian terrorists at Munich Olympics 1972

This moment of silence was supported by most Western countries including Israel, Canada, the UK, Australia, Belgium , Germany, Italy, and even Barack Hussein Obama. (Although his support was conspicuously absent until he was sure the Olympic committee had denied  the request)

Sportscaster and Olympics commentator, Bob Costas, will, however, hold a moment of silence for the slain Israeli athletes during the opening ceremonies for America. (More on this below)

On this, the 40th anniversary of this Islamic barbarism, the families of the victims, led by Munich widow Ankie Spitzer petitioned the International Olympic Committee to honor the memory of the murdered athletes with a minute of silence. But threats to boycott the Games by several Muslim countries are why the Olympic Committee turned down the 60-second tribute.

Ankie Spitzer, Dutch-born widow of Israel’s fencing coach Andre Spitzer

For those who don’t remember the Munich Massacre:

Tablet  When the Olympics returned to Germany in 1972, the German government was intent that nothing about them evoke the memory of the 1936 Berlin games, held under the heavy hand of Nazi militarism. The Germans wanted these to be “the Happy Games.” Security would not be in evidence: Athletes freely climbed over the chain link fence surrounding the Olympic Village when they forgot their identification badges. Everything had to be relaxed. Germany had a new face to show the world.

That all changed on the morning of Sept. 5, when Palestinian terrorists from Fatah’s Black September organization scaled the fence around the Olympic Village. Armed with machine guns and grenades, they immediately killed two Israeli athletes and took nine others hostage. They demanded that Israel release 234 Palestinian prisoners and Germany release the two founding members of the Baader-Meinhof Gang.

When the release did not materialize by the late afternoon, the terrorists demanded a plane to take them to Egypt. German officials agreed but planned an ambush at the airport. The ambush was completely botched: A team of German police assigned to entrap the terrorists walked off the job as the terrorists were on their way to the airport. There were more terrorists than German snipers—and the snipers could not communicate with each other or with the officials in charge. Armored cars, which were ordered for backup, got caught in an hour-long traffic jam around the airport.

A gun battle erupted between the German forces and the terrorists on the tarmac, and the athletes, whom the captors had bound one to another in the helicopters that had brought them to the airport, were caught in the middle. When the terrorists realized that they could not escape, they shot the hostages and then threw a grenade into the helicopters to ensure that they were dead.

Why the IOC refusal? The Olympic Committee’s official explanation is that the games are apolitical. The families were repeatedly told by long-time IOC President Juan Samaranch that the Olympic movement avoided political issues. He seemed to have forgotten that at the 1996 opening ceremony he spoke about the Bosnian war. Politics were also present at the 2002 games, which opened with a minute of silence for the victims of 9/11.

The families have also been told that a commemoration of this sort was inappropriate at the opening of such a celebratory event. However, the IOC has memorialized other athletes who died “in the line of duty.” At the 2010 winter games, for example, there was a moment of silence to commemorate an athlete who died in a training accident.

The IOC’s explanation is nothing more than a pathetic excuse. The athletes who were murdered were from Israel and were Jews—that is why they aren’t being remembered. The only conclusion one can draw is that Jewish blood is cheap, too cheap to risk upsetting a bloc of Arab nations and other countries that oppose Israel and its policies.

This was the greatest tragedy to ever occur during the Olympic Games. Yet the IOC has made it quite clear that these victims are not worth 60 seconds. Imagine for a moment that these athletes had been from the United States, Canada, Australia, or even Germany. No one would think twice about commemorating them. But these athletes came from a country and a people who somehow deserve to be victims. Their lost lives are apparently not worth a minute.

Bob Costas to honor slain Israeli athletes in his live NBC broadcast:

The International Olympic Committee’s (IOC) immoral decision to reject calls for a moment of silence for Israeli’s athletes murdered at the 1972 Munich  games will not go unnoticed.

Sportcaster Bob Costas told the Hollywood Reporter this week that he had his own plans for a tribute to the athletes as part of his duties covering the Olympics for NBC Sports.

At the July 27 Opening Ceremony from London, Costas plans to call out the IOC for denying Israel’s request for a moment of silence acknowledging the massacre of 11 Israeli athletes and coaches at the 1972 Games. On the 40th anniversary of Munich, it’s a decision he finds “baffling.” When the Israeli delegation enters the 80,000-seat Olympic Stadium, Costas will stage his own protest: “I intend to note that the IOC denied the request,” he says, modulating his voice as if he were on the air. “Many people find that denial more than puzzling but insensitive. Here’s a minute of silence right now.”

“They’re all gone.”