Taliban Johnny suing Indiana prison for forcing him to pray near the toilet in his cell rather than together with his Muslim terrorist pals

American Taliban member, John Walker Lindt, captured in Afghanistan, launches legal battle for group prayer because he doesn’t like to pray in his cell which he thinks is too close to the toilet. This is what happens when you don’t kill these American Muslim traitors when you capture them on the battlefield.

TALIBAN JOHNNY NOW AND THEN

Daily Mail  (H/T Susan K) An American-born Taliban fighter, John Walker Lindh, who is serving a 20-year sentence for aiding the Taliban, testified in federal court Monday in Indianapolis in an attempt to overturn a prison ban that he says severely restricts Muslim prayer. He will try to convince a federal judge that his religious freedom trumps security concerns in a closely watched trial that will examine how far prisons can go to ensure security in the age of terrorism. 

John Walker Lindh was expected to testify Monday in Indianapolis during the first day of the trial over prayer policies in a tightly restricted prison unit where he and other high-risk inmates have severely limited contact with the outside world.

Lindh, 31, a Muslim convert who was charged with supporting terrorists after he was captured by U.S. troops in Afghanistan and later pleaded guilty to lesser charges, claims his religious rights are being violated because the federal prison in Terre Haute deprives him of daily group prayer.

TALIBAN JOHNNY WITH HIS TERRORIST PALS IN AFGHANISTAN

Also housed with Lindh, according to published reports, are members of the “Lackawanna Six,” a group of Yemeni-American friends who were convicted of providing material support to al Qaeda; Ali Asad Chandia, convicted of providing aid to a Pakistani terror organization; and Enaam Arnaout, who pleaded guilty to using donations to his charitable foundation to support fighters in Bosnia.

Muslims are required to pray five times a day, and the Hanbali school to which Lindh belongs requires group prayer if it is possible. But inmates in the Communications Management Unit are allowed to pray together only once a week except during Ramadan. At other times, they must pray in their individual cells. Lindh says that doesn’t meet the Quran’s requirements and is inappropriate because he is forced to kneel in close proximity to his toilet.

The Anti-American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana, which is representing Lindh, contends the policy violates a federal law barring the government from restricting religious activities without showing a compelling need.