On the Saudi Royal Family’s flying palace, there are no flight attendants wearing headbags, and you can bet you’ll find a large stock of top shelf liquors

While half his people live in poverty, Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal bin Abdulaziz Al-Saud shows off his $485 million converted Airbus A380, which, when completed, will be the world’s largest private jet.

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The plane usually seats 600, but lots of room had to be cleared for various perks. Naturally, there’s an on-board garage, so that the prince can be driven right to the threshold of the airplane’s elevator.

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After arrival, he can retire to his master suite–one of five with king-size beds, and computer generated prayer mats which always face Mecca, up to 20 extra-guests have to make due in sleepers that are the equivalent of first class.

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Not to forget there’s also a concert hall that seats ten and has a baby grand piano; a boardroom with a holographic projector; and a full-size steam room.

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But The most entertaining perk is a “Wellbeing Room” which has a floor upon which is projected an enormous image of what the plane is flying over–thus creating a “magic carpet” effect.

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Interesting anedcote from a man who used to own a fleet of private jets, which were often rented to Arab Princes. Come what may, at 17:00 hr, the Arabs would lay down their prayer rugs  facing Mecca.  The pilot with a sense of humour would turn the plane in another direction, claiming that the sun was in their eyes, avoiding air turbulence or whatever & the groveling Arabs would have to adjust the positions of their rugs accordingly with their compasses in the corridor.  (h/t Rick W)

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