Oh, Goodie! Feb. 1, 2013 is World Hijab (headbag) Day

hillary-in-blue-hijab-300x205Hey, all you infidel whores, pour yourself your favorite alcoholic beverage, grab the nearest garbage bag, potato sack, curtain, or your favorite colorful schmatta (rag), and wrap it around your head to show your solidarity with the genitally mutilated, oppressed women of the Muslim world.

World Hijab Day  (h/t Michael T) calls on non-Muslim women to try out life under the traditional head scarf. Can it lead to more religious tolerance and understanding?


Oppressed! Subjugated! These are probably the words that come to your mind when you see a Muslim woman covered in Hijab (Headbag)  – the Islamic modest covering of a woman. You assume it’s her father or some radical male member from her family who is forcing her to dress that way. At least that is what people say to you. That is how the media views Muslim women who cover. Let me ask you, have you heard of the famous sayings: “go straight to the source?” Or “walk a day in my shoes?” I am sure you have heard these a million times. 

stacks_image_44-e1359750443788 Let me use the first. I ask you sincerely, have you ever gone to the true source for information about Hijab and Islam?  Have you read books, asked scholars or visited a Mosque? Have you ever asked a Muslim woman why she is so covered in a world that seeks to shed as much clothing as possible?  If you asked a Muslim woman, she would inform you that the purpose behind her Hijab is to obey her Creator over the creation. Her Creator, Allah (God), did not legislate Hijab in order to oppress her, but rather to free her from the shackles of this world. He ordered Hijab as an honor and sign of dignity for women. 

World Hijab Day 1 When a Muslim woman covers her hair, chest and body, she is sending a silent message that she respects her body and like a pearl in the ocean, she covers it with her beautiful shell (Hijab). No one has the right to observe, gawk at and judge a Muslim woman by the highlights in her hair or curves on her body. Instead they judge her for what is in her mind, her character, and her goals and ambitions.  Hijab is prevention from being accosted by ignorant minds who only judge a woman by the clothes she wears and the skin she shows. A woman’s body as you know is sacred and this is why Islam encourages women to strive to cover and protect it.

523228_482555428434871_1052589592_n Let us return to the second saying, “Walk a day in my shoes.” This is where WHD comes in. What is that you ask? WHD is short for World Hijab Day. This first time annual event will be held on February 1st, 2013 (God willing). On this day, we ask Non-Muslim and Non-Hijabi Muslim women worldwide to observe Hijab for a day. It will be a day for everyone willing to experience what it’s like to step inside the shoes of a Hijabi. Our hopes are no less than that. We wish you will gain a wealth of knowledge and experience a slightly different definition of FREEDOM. 

stacks_image_13My name is Ela. I am seventeen years old. I am not Muslim, but my friend told me about her friend being discriminated against for wearing a hijab. So I decided to see the discrimination firsthand to get a better understanding of what Muslim women go through. 

stacks_image_11My friend and I pinned scarves around our heads, and then we went to the mall. Normally, vendors try to get us to buy things and ask us to sample a snack. Clerks usually ask us if we need help, tell us about sales, and smile at us. Not today. People, including vendors, clerks, and other shoppers, wouldn’t look at us. They didn’t talk to us. They acted like we didn’t exist. They didn’t want to be caught staring at us, so they didn’t look at all. 

And then, in one store, a girl (who looked about four years old) asked her mom if my friend and I were terrorists. She wasn’t trying to be mean or anything. I don’t even think she could have grasped the idea of prejudice. However, her mother’s response is one I can never forgive or forget. The mother hushed her child, glared at me, and then took her daughter by the hand and led her out of the store. 


All that because I put a scarf on my head. Just like that, a mother taught her little girl that being Muslim was evil. It didn’t matter that I was a nice person. All that mattered was that I looked different. That little girl may grow up and teach her children the same thing. 

This experiment gave me a huge wake-up call. It lasted for only a few hours, so I can’t even begin to imagine how much prejudice Muslim girls go through every day. It reminded me of something that many people know but rarely remember: the women in hijabs are people, just like all those women out there who aren’t Muslim.”


A much more interesting take on World Hijab Day comes from Maryam Namazie, Spokesperson of the One Law for All Campaign against Sharia Law in Britain, the Council of Ex-Muslims of Britain and Equal Rights Now – Organisation against Women’s Discrimination in Iran.


Maryam Namazie

Today is World Hijab Day! What next?

Maybe we can all try to mutilate our daughters on World Mutilation Day or marry off our girls on World Child Marriages Day? How about a day when our male guardians can track our whereaboutsto make sure we aren’t leaving the country.

I know adult women have a right to wear the hijab (given the threats and compulsory nature of it in most places – this is very often just a formality but nonetheless) but to ask others to wear it is a tad absurd – if I’m being polite.

I am sorry but I don’t think I am the cause of fitna/chaos in the world and therefore find the veil abhorrent.

So here is my tribute to the hijab: