Muslim Brotherhood-linked CAIR strong arms university into changing its safety rules to accommodate one Muslim wrestler with beard

When Muhamed McBryde had to choose between shaving his beard and competing for the University at Buffalo, the decision was easy, he sat on the sidelines.

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Buffalo News  The student believes shaving the beard would compromise his faith. He is Muslim. Even though NCAA rules clearly state that all competing wrestlers must be cleanshaven, the 17-year-old junior said he never considered getting rid of his facial hair.

“My religion says you’re supposed to keep a beard,” said McBryde of Buffalo. His refusal to shave, though, cost him nearly a full season of competition. McBryde and his father, Mustafa – with assistance from a national Muslim civil rights group – pressed the university to request a rules waiver from the NCAA.

Their persistence paid off in April, when the NCAA Wrestling Rules Committee granted a waiver, allowing McBryde to compete with a beard during the 2014-15 season, as long as he wears a face mask and chin strap to cover it. The university will have to make an additional request for a waiver for any other seasons in which McBryde competes.

Azerbaijani Greco-Roman style, double European champion Elchin Aliyev left the national team after coaches forbade him to compete with a beard, citing reasons of hygiene and courtesy to the opponent and can get in a way during fight

Azerbaijani Greco-Roman style, double European champion Elchin Aliyev left the national team after coaches forbade him to compete with a beard, citing reasons of hygiene and courtesy to the opponent during fight

CAIR  That action by the NCAA Wrestling Rules Committee came after CAIR’s intervention and after the civil rights group urged university officials to request the waiver. The Muslim wrestler will be allowed to compete with a beard during the 2014-15 season as long as he wears a face mask and chin strap.

“Now that this individual waiver has been granted, we will work with the NCAA to change its policy to allow beards for all competitors nationwide,” said Sadyia Khalique, director of operations for CAIR’s New York chapter (CAIR-NY). The wrestler’s family initially contacted CAIR-NY, which brought the issue to the university.

“We welcome this reasonable religious accommodation by the NCAA, which will enable Muslim athletes to participate in wrestling without violating their religious beliefs,” said CAIR Staff Attorney Gadeir Abbas, who worked with the family, the university and the NCAA to obtain the waiver.

watan-magzine

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