Massacre possible by Islamic State (ISIS) terrorists as Syrian Kurds plead for help

ISIS fighters entered the besieged Syrian Kurdish city of Kobani, situated near the Turkish border, that is already suffering the effects of militants cutting its water and electricity supplies. Alan Minbic, a fighter with the Kurdish People’s Protection Unit, or YPG, told CNN that ISIS now controls the southwest corner of the city, known in Arabic as Ayn al-Arab.

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CNN  If ISIS takes Kobani, it will control a complete swath of land from its self-declared capital of Raqqa, Syria, on the Euphrates River to the Turkish border, more than 60 miles away.

Thousands of civilians have fled the predominantly Kurdish city in northern Syria in recent days as ISIS forces apparently have advanced inexorably toward it.

Kurdish fighters still have not received the heavy arms they have requested from the U.S.

Kurdish fighters still have not received the heavy arms they have requested from the U.S.

The Sunni extremist group’s reported entry into the city comes a day after Turkish lawmakers voted overwhelmingly to authorize military force against ISIS in Iraq and Syria. (Gee, that’s odd, considering that Turkey has been arming them and allowing them entry to Syria via Turkey for the past two years. Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu vowed to help the Kurdish fighters defend Kobani from ISIS. (Oh right, as if Turkey gives a crap about what happens to the Kurds)

On Friday, Syria accused Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of turning his country “into a springboard of aggression against Syria under the false claim of fighting terrorism and protecting Turkey’s national security,” according to letters from the Foreign and Expatriates Ministry to the United Nations, Syrian state news agency SANA reported.

Tanks belonging to ISIS firing on Ayn al-Arab city (Kobani) during clashes with Kurdish armed groups

Tanks belonging to ISIS seen firing on Ayn al-Arab city (Kobani) during clashes with Kurdish armed groups

The ministry said Turkey was responsible for “every single drop of blood that has been shed in Syria” because it provided political, military and logistical support to terrorist organizations and was a conduit for militants traveling to Syria.

U.S. airstrikes have been directed against ISIS positions in the Kobani area this week. But U.S. Central Command said there were no further strikes in the area overnight into Friday.