CARLY FIORINA, a Republican presidential candidate who thinks “the Islamic Ottoman civilization was the greatest in the world?”

anmdda09b81cb0a5896If the answer is ‘NO,’ then you don’t want to vote for Carly Fiorina. Apart from her terrible record at Hewlett Packard, Fiorina said in a speech just two weeks after the horrific 9/11 Muslim terrorist attacks on America that she believes “the Islamic Ottoman Empire civilization was the greatest in the world.”

Freedom Outpost (h/t Catherine P)  The former HP chief executive officer gave a speech on technology, business and our way of life. She concluded her speech (below) with the following lies and propaganda that could have been written for her by designated terrorist group CAIR. Fiorina should be ashamed of herself for promoting such easy-to-refute misinformation.

7295763_G

“There was once a civilization that was the greatest in the world.

It was able to create a continental super-state that stretched from ocean to ocean, and from northern climes to tropics and deserts. Within its dominion lived hundreds of millions of people, of different creeds and ethnic origins.

One of its languages became the universal language of much of the world, the bridge between the peoples of a hundred lands. Its armies were made up of people of many nationalities, and its military protection allowed a degree of peace and prosperity that had never been known. The reach of this civilization’s commerce extended from Latin America to China, and everywhere in between.

622x3506-vi

And this civilization was driven more than anything, by invention. Its architects designed buildings that defied gravity.

Architecture

MYTH:The pointed arch so characteristic of Europe’s Gothic cathedrals was an invention borrowed from Islamic architecture. It was much stronger than the rounded arch used by the Romans and Normans, thus allowing the building of bigger, higher, more complex and grander buildings. Other borrowings from Muslim genius included ribbed vaulting, rose windows and domebuilding techniques. Europe’s castles were also adapted to copy the Islamic world’s – with arrow slits, battlements, a barbican and parapets. Square towers and keeps gave way to more easily defended round ones. Henry V’s castle architect was a Muslim.

FACT: When it comes to revolutionary architectural inventions, nothing is greater than the creation of concrete, a material perfected by the Romans. This enabled them to erect buildings that would have been impossible to construct using the traditional stone post-and-lintel system. This development made possible the construction of the amphitheatres, baths and hillside temples of the Roman world. With that said and done, although the pointed arch only came into general use in the 13th century, it was in fact the Assyrians (not the Muslims) who first used it as early as 722 BC.

As for the Islamic techniques of domebuilding; the best example of a dome in the ancient world is the Pantheon in Rome, built almost 500 years before Islam in 118–135 AD by Apollodorus of Damascus and again only made possible through the concrete mixture perfected by the Romans. Originally a temple to the Roman deities, it has been a Christian church since the 7th century. It is an important and impressive feat of design, a building which after almost 2,000 years of continuous use has its original roof intact.

With all these facts considered, we think it’s safe to assume that architectural development in Europe and the rest of the non-Islamic world would and indeed did move along fine without the so-called ‘Muslim genius’.

Its mathematicians created the algebra and algorithms that would enable the building of computers, and the creation of encryption.

The system of numbering

MYTH: Muslims claim Algebra was named after al-Khwarizmi’s book, Al-Jabr wa-al-Muqabilah, much of whose contents are still in use. The work of Muslim maths scholars was imported into Europe 300 years later by the Italian mathematician Fibonacc.

FACT: Algebra may have been named after a book by al-Khwarizmi titled Al-Jabr wa-al-Muqabilah, but the origins of algebra itself can be traced to the ancient Babylonians who were able to do calculations in an algorithmic fashion. Having something named after what popularised or refined it by no means makes it the inventor, and by doing so you would have to discount the works of mathematician Diophantus of Alexandria (200 and 214 AD–284 and 298 AD) who authored a series of books called “Arithmetica” and is commonly referred to as “the father of algebra”. Paul Vallely begrudgingly admits that the system of numbering in use all round the world is ‘probably’ Indian in origin, yet the title of the supposed Islamic invention still remains “The system of numbering.”

Its doctors examined the human body, and found new cures for disease. Its astronomers looked into the heavens, named the stars, and paved the way for space travel and exploration. 

Flying:

MYTH: A thousand years before the Wright brothers a Muslim poet, astronomer, musician and engineer named Abbas ibn Firnas made several attempts to construct a flying machine. In 852 he jumped from the minaret of the Grand Mosque in Cordoba using a loose cloak stiffened with wooden struts.  In 875, aged 70, having perfected a machine of silk and eagles’ feathers he tried again, jumping from a mountain. He flew to a significant height and stayed aloft for ten minutes but crashed on landing – concluding, correctly, that it was because he had not given his device a tail so it would stall on landing.

FACT: As far as flying is concerned, at the beginning were the kites, and these were a Chinese invention. They date back as far as 3,000 years, where they were made from bamboo and silk in China. The Chinese also tried to produce flying machines. In the book Pao Phu Tzu, dated AD 320, Ko Hung states: “Some have made flying cars with wood, using ox-leather straps fastened to returning blades to set the machines in motion”. He is clearly describing rotating blades attached to a spinning axle and driven by a (leather) belt that is a rotor top the principal of which underlie the modern-day helicopter.

Its writers created thousands of stories. Stories of courage, romance and magic. Its poets wrote of love, when others before them were too steeped in fear to think of such things.

When other nations were afraid of ideas, this civilization thrived on them, and kept them alive. When censors threatened to wipe out knowledge from past civilizations, this civilization kept the knowledge alive, and passed it on to others.

While modern Western civilization shares many of these traits, the civilization I’m talking about was the Islamic world from the year 800 to 1600, which included the Ottoman Empire and the courts of Baghdad, Damascus and Cairo, and enlightened rulers like Suleiman the Magnificent.

crusades-vi

Although we are often unaware of our indebtedness to this other civilization, its gifts are very much a part of our heritage. The technology industry would not exist without the contributions of Arab mathematicians. Sufi poet-philosophers like Rumi challenged our notions of self and truth. Leaders like Suleiman contributed to our notions of tolerance and civic leadership.

And perhaps we can learn a lesson from his example: It was leadership based on meritocracy, not inheritance. It was leadership that harnessed the full capabilities of a very diverse population–that included Christianity, Islamic, and Jewish traditions.

B8s4ouZIcAAgZdN_jpglarge-vi

This kind of enlightened leadership — leadership that nurtured culture, sustainability, diversity and courage — led to 800 years of invention and prosperity.”

The truth is Muslims have nothing to show in science today and need to make up for it pointing to the past – as though that would compensate for the lack of a scientific orientation today. Alas, the claim that there were significant inventions and earth-shattering discoveries made at the time is also false. SEE: they-came-they-saw-they-plagiarized-1001-so-called-muslim-inventions-virtually-none-of-which-were-actually-invented-by-muslims

Though Fiorina did acknowledge Christianity and Judaism in culture, she did not call them “a civilization that was the greatest in the world.” She failed to recognize violence and slaughter of more than 270 million non-Muslims in the long track record of Islam and its culture in the Middle East. In fact, understanding that we are a Christian nation, one would think that she would reference the rich heritage of Europe or even our early founding, but instead, two weeks after Islamists attacked America, she decided to praise the culture that spawned them.

So, Fiorina has promoted lies from an anti-Christ religion and culture. Is this really the kind of person conservatives, let alone Christians, should be getting behind? If she does this with Islam and history, what do you think her mindset would be when it comes to the Constitution?

Not surprisingly, Islamopanderer Fiorina pooh-poohed Pamela Geller’s ‘Draw the prophet Muhammad’ cartoon contest saying: “It clearly was provocative, just like white supremacists demonstrating is provocative.”