It is said you should judge a man by the company he keeps… get to know the man Presidential Candidate Gov. Scott Walker chose as foreign policy advisor

kevinhermeningKevin Hermening (photo right) is quickly becoming the face of Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker’s foreign policy. Hermening, a former Iranian hostage, was one of 52 Americans held hostage for 444 days more than 3 decades ago by militant Iranian students. He was a 20-year-old Marine sergeant stationed at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran at the time.

Journal Sentinel  The Republican governor cited Hermening when opposing the nuclear deal with Iran. Walker said Hermening had taught him that Iran “is not a place we should be doing business with.”

Imprisoned in Iran, Kevin Hermening, bottom left
Imprisoned in Iran, Kevin Hermening, bottom left

Shortly after 9/11, Hermening expressed these points in an inflammatory opinion piece for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel in September 2001, just weeks after the Sept. 11 terror attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

“Every military response must be considered, including the use of nuclear warheads,” Hermening wrote in the column. And his views have not changed much since then.

There, Hermening called for the deportation of all illegal immigrants, especially those with a Middle Eastern background and anyone who reacted “with glee” to the coordinated attacks by 19 al-Qaeda terrorists. He also urged wiping out the capitals of seven heavily Muslim countries — if they didn’t support American efforts to kill Osama bin Laden.

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The fact that Ibrahim ‘Dougie’ Hooper, the national spokeskihadist for designated terrorist group CAIR (Council on American-Islamic Relations), denounced Hermening’s views on Muslims as “utter nonsense” and “extremist,” is reason enough to give Scott Walker some serious consideration.

Hooper asked how undocumented immigrants would be tracked down and would Hermening have favored a two-track deportation system, one for Muslims and one for non-Muslims.

Ronald Reagan, Kevin Hermening

As for nuking the capitals of various Middle Eastern and northern African countries, Hooper said no reasonable person was advocating such views. He said it was disturbing that Walker is being advised by someone who pushed this proposal.

In the 2001 article, Hermening outlined a four-point plan that he described as “the only acceptable and appropriate responses” to the attacks.

First, he called for the “immediate and unequivocal deportation of every illegal alien and immigrant.” He said this effort should “focus on removing those of Middle Eastern descent, and especially those who reacted with glee at the horror of Sept. 11.”

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In addition, Hermening said he favored a “prompt and massive military response that includes the destruction of the capitals of Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, Sudan and Yemen.” The only way out, he said, would be if these countries “agree unequivocally to support our efforts to kill Osama bin Laden.”

“After the annihilation of each country’s capitals, we can make them the same kind of financial offer we made to the leaders of Japan and Germany after World War II,” Hermening continued. “Cooperate with us in the establishment of democratic governments, and we will assist you in every possible way. Don’t cooperate, and your people will perpetually suffer — that ought to be our unspoken message.”

Some have suggested, Hermening said, that he can’t get past his experience as a hostage in Iran. He said he doesn’t see it that way. “Iran is a part of my life — it isn’t my life,” he said. “It helped make who I am today. It’s given me this view: You need to be trusting of your international partners, defending your global allies and standing tall and tough against countries that are adversarial to you.”

Even if that means, in some cases, deporting people of Middle Eastern descent and resorting to using nuclear weapons.