AUSTRALIA: MUSLIM TERRORIST stabs 3 people and a dog, one British woman dead, man who tried to save her fighting for life

Police can’t figure out a motive. But one media source says the Muslim terrorist, Smail Ayad, 29, might have been driven by “infatuation.” (HAH! That’s a new one)

Smail Ayad, 29, Muslim attacker

Smail Ayad, 29, Muslim “Allahu Akbar” attacker

Australian  Friends of a British backpacker stabbed more than 20 times as he tried in vain to save the life of a young woman allegedly knifed by a MUSLIM shouting “Allahu Akbar” at a north Queensland hostel are praying he recovers.  Up to 30 terrified witnesses at the Shelley’s Home Hill hostel 100km south of Townsville watched as Smail Ayad, 29, burst in crying “Our god is greater” in Arabic.

British backpacker, Mia Aylifee Chung

British backpacker, Mia Aylifee Chung, 21, dead victim

Mia Ayliffe-Chung, 21, from Britain, was allegedly stabbed to death in the attack at about 11.15pm on Tuesday. She had been in north Queensland working on a sugarcane farm to allow her to renew her visa to stay in Australia. British backpacker Tom Jackson, 30, was fighting for his life last night after attempting to intervene. Another man, Grant Scholz, was stabbed in the leg. A dog at the property was also slaughtered. Oliver Chard last night posted a message of support to Mr Jackson.

The Courier-Mail reports Ayad had recently become Facebook friends with Ms Ayliffe-Chung and police are investigating whether a romantic obsession may have sparked his attack.

Hero: British man Tom Jackson, 30, was stabbed 15 times in the face as he tried to save Ms Ayliffe-Chung from the knife-wielding maniac. He is fighting for his life in hospital

Hero: British man Tom Jackson, 30, was stabbed 15 times in the face as he tried to save Ms Ayliffe-Chung from the knife-wielding maniac. He is fighting for his life in hospital

Police officers captured the man shouting “Allahu Akbar” on body-worn cameras. “While this information will be factored into the investigation we are not ruling out any motivations at this stage, whether they be political or criminal,” Mr Gollschewski said. “We’re working closely with our partner agencies to make sure if there is any indication that it has an extremist slant, or this person had been radicalised, we can discover that.”

He said investigators would look at mental health or drug misuse “factors”, and said Mr Ayad did not have any known links to the Islamic State terror group.

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