SAUDI ARABIA awards King Faisal International Prize to radical cleric who blames George W. Bush for 9/11

Controversial preacher Zakir Naik awarded the King Faisal international prize for promoting Islam through his hugely popular Peace TV channel. The Indian-born Islamic preacher who has called the 9/11 attacks an “inside job” received one of Saudi Arabia’s most prestigious prizes on Sunday, for “service to Islam.”

Gee, that's funny, considering that 15 of the 19 9/11 hijackers were Saudi nationals

Gee, that’s funny, considering that 15 of the 19 9/11 hijackers were Saudi nationals

The Guardian via TROP  Zakir Naik, president of the Islamic Research Foundation in India, was one of five recipients of the King Faisal international prize from Saudi Arabia’s King Salman during a ceremony at a luxury Riyadh hotel.

Naik was honoured for being one of the most renowned non-Arabic speaking promoters of Islam. He founded the Peace TV channel, billed as the world’s only channel specialising in comparative religion. “Islam is the only religion that can bring peace to the whole of humanity,” he said in a video biography aired at the ceremony.

Especially like this:

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[UPDATED!] “JE SUIS CHARLIE” is dead, killed by threats of more Muslim violence

Artwork by a Muslim, considered “blasphemous” by Muslim lunatics because it shows several pairs of women’s high-heeled shoes on Islamic prayer mats, has been removed from a Paris exhibition after warnings of possible violence by Muslim terrorists.

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Telegraph  The French-Algerian artist, Zoulikha Bouabdellah, withdrew the work from an exhibition in a northern Paris suburb with a large Muslim population after an Islamic group told local authorities it could provoke “uncontrollable, irresponsible incidents”. It is considered disrespectful to step on Muslim prayer maps with shoes.

Ms Bouabdellah has replaced the artwork, “Silence”, previously exhibited in Paris, New York, Berlin and Madrid, with a video installation showing belly-dancing to the French national anthem, with swirling red, white and blue shawls symbolising the national flag.

Artist Zoulikha Bouabdellah

Artist Zoulikha Bouabdellah

The decision sparked protests from other artists who complained that freedom of expression was being undermined only weeks after 12 people were killed when gunmen attacked the office of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, which published cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed. 

Ms Bouabdellah, 37, said that the “lack of understanding” of her work was probably related to “heightened emotions” after the attacks.

Where is Charlie now?

Where is Charlie now?

“I’m left wondering at the reasons that push a certain fringe among French Muslims to see this work as blasphemous,” she said. “I’m from a Muslim background and my intention was not to shock or provoke, but to offer a vision as a starting point for a dialogue.”

The French artist Orlan, who also has a work on display in the all-female exhibition in Clichy La Garenne, expressed outrage. “I protest against all pressures and/or threats that would result in a peaceful art work being pulled from an exhibition, be it due to a Christian group, a Muslim group, or a group of other beliefs,” she wrote in an open letter on Facebook.

Orlan said the removal of the artwork made a “mockery” of the principle of freedom of expression only weeks after the Charlie Hebdo attack and a huge solidarity march in Paris in which David Cameron and some 50 other world leaders took part.

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But that’s not all: A Museum in Belgium cancels Charlie Hebdo tribute because of Muslim threats of violence. Comics Museum near Brussels says police presented them with body of evidence on ‘nature of potential risks’ posed by Muslims.

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i24 NEWS  Belgian museum dedicated to the creator of comic book hero Tintin said Thursday that security concerns prompted it to cancel an exhibition honoring the murdered Charlie Hebdo magazine cartoonists.

The museum in Louvain-la-Neuve near Brussels said it took the decision after consulting Wednesday with police who foiled an Islamist plot in Belgium last week, which followed the jihadist attack on Charlie Hebdo in Paris. “The police presented us with the nature of the potential risks we need to be attentive to,” said Nick Rodwell, director of the museum dedicated to the memory and works of Herge.

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“We decided not to open our exhibition on Thursday morning insofar as it could raise the concerns of both museum staff and the residents of Louvain-la-Neuve,” he said in a statement. The exhibition was supposed to feature portraits of the murdered Charlie Hebdo cartoonists as well as the latest controversial caricature of the prophet Muhammad, published after the Paris attack.

The government raised the threat alert to three on a scale of four after police conducted a series of raids January 15 to foil an Islamist plot to kill Belgian police.

The cartoons of the prophet triggered Muslim anger worldwide and sparked death threats from jihadist groups.

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VOILA! ‘Je Suis Charlie’ is alive and well in Prague! Leave it to the Czech Republic, a country that has has big brass ones when it comes to beating back the threat posed by Islam, to show the kind of courage that Western European leaders lack.

Prague Monitor (h/t Nat) An exhibition presenting nearly 200 front pages of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, whose Paris editors were recently killed by terrorists, was opened in Prague’s DOX gallery Wednesday, amid security measures.

výstava titulních stránek satirického týdeníku Charlie Hebdo---exhibition presenting nearly 200 front pages of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo

DOX gallery founder Leos Valka told Wednesday’s daily Hospodarske noviny (HN) that both the preparation of the exhibition and its opening for invited guests on Tuesday were kept secret. The national and municipal police and the anti-terrorist squad has been participating in the security measures accompanying the exhibition.

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Last week, a similar exhibition was to open in Belgium but the organisers cancelled it at the last moment, apparently after a discussion with the Belgian secret service, HN writes. Valka said he hopes Czechs will be able to make their own opinion about Charlie Hebdo thanks to the Prague exhibition.

“With a few exceptions, the Czech public has had no opportunity to see Charlie Hebdo. We translated the main caricatures into Czech and English as otherwise they would not make sense to people who don’t speak French,” he told HN. Valka said he got the idea of this exhibition after he read that Paris galleries were planning an exhibition on Charlie Hebdo.

výstava titulních stránek satirického týdeníku Charlie Hebdo---exhibition presenting nearly 200 front pages of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo

From private collectors Valka borrowed old copies of the magazine, which was first published in 1960. After several bans it was renamed from Hara-Kiri to Charlie Hebdo. It was banned for a lack of respect for the death of French president Charles de Gaulle.

“We wanted to show that Charlie Hebdo editors have been strongly against the authorities for a long time. The magazine always had a markedly left-wing character and it has been consistent for years. It had no taboos and was critical of everything,” Valka told the paper. He noted that DOX does not try to analyse the magazine from the ethical or artistic points of view.

výstava titulních stránek satirického týdeníku Charlie Hebdo---exhibition presenting nearly 200 front pages of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo

DOX has been regularly organising exhibitions dealing with political and social issues. One of them, Modes of Democracy, has been running since November and it will last until mid-March. It wants to present inspirational stories of democracy from around the world.

Also Wednesday, the National Technical Library in Prague and the People in Need NGO organise the screening of a documentary film on a trial of Charlie Hebdo over caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad published eight years ago, to be followed by a discussion on Islam in Europe.

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TURKEY orders Facebook to block pages that insult the paedophile prophet Mohammed

safe_image.phpUsually very Islamo-friendly Facebook has been ordered by a Turkish court to block all pages insulting the Prophet Mohammed or risk having Facebook banned entirely from the country.

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UK Daily Mail  Turkey, an increasingly radical fascistic muslim country that has been demanding to be given membership in the EU, has also banned web access to cover of Charlie Hebdo magazine in a move that is seen as yet another crackdown on offensive religious material.

A Turkish court has ordered authorities to block access to Facebook pages that ‘insult’ the Prophet Mohammed and warned the whole site will be banned if the company doesn’t comply. The country’s state-run news agency confirmed that a court in Ankara issued the order yesterday, following a request by a prosecutor. 

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The decision comes just days after another court ruling banned access in Turkey to web pages featuring the controversial cover of the French satirical magazine, Charlie Hebdo depicting the Prophet Mohammed.

It is the latest move to crack down on material seen as offending religious sensibilities in the largely Muslim nation, where the government of President Tayyip Erdogan is viewed as pursuing an Islamist-leaning agenda.

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Facebook have yet to comment on the ruling but earlier this month Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said the company would not censor content published in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo attacks. He added that the social network would ‘never let one country or group of people dictate what people can share across the world.’

However, according to statistics released by Facebook, the company has removed 1,893 ‘pieces of content’ at the request of the Turkish government.

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Earlier this month, Turkey’s president began to press for new legislation which would allow ministers to temporarily ban websites, such as Facebook, and force Twitter to block an anonymous whistleblower.

The proposed law would allow ministers to restrict access to websites deemed to threaten lives, public order or rights and freedoms. The Telecommunications Directorate (TIB) would have to comply within four hours, and then apply for a court order for the ban to be extended beyond 24 hours.

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Communications minister Lutfu Elvan this week defended the proposal, saying it was needed after Turkey’s top court in October annulled previous legislation giving greater powers to ban websites, and saying it would only be used in emergencies.

Last year Turkey came under international criticism for temporary bans on Facebook and Twitter as a corruption scandal unfolded.  Erdogan vowed to ‘eradicate’ Twitter after allegations of government corruption were published on the micro-blogging site.

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Meanwhile Facebook was briefly banned in Pakistan along with Twitter after the sites refused to remove pictures pertaining to be the Prophet Muhammad. Facebook did eventually bow to pressure and blocked the images in Pakistan. 

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PAKISTAN Muslim leader threatens cartoons mocking paedophile prophet Mohammed could lead to WWIII

Demands that the UN impose laws that make blasphemy against Islam an international crime.

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Tribune (via TROP) Jamaat-e-Islami chief Sirajul Haq has said the west’s ‘extremist standpoint’ on blasphemous caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) may lead to a third world war. “The path that the West has chosen will take the world to a third world war,” Siraj said on Friday.

He was addressing thousands of people at a rally, organised to protest against the insulting caricatures published in Western publications, particularly French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.

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The JI chief demanded that the United Nations make laws to discourage blasphemy of all religious personalities. He said France must apologise for hurting sentiments of billions of Muslims across the world.

Addressing the rally, Federal Minister for Railways Khawaja Saad Rafique said the life of a Muslim is useless if he cannot protect the honour and dignity of his Prophet (pbuh). Earlier, the rally marched from Faizabad Flyover through Islamabad Highway to the Blue Area of the capital.

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Meanwhile, activists of Ahle Sunnat Wal Jamaat (ASWJ) also held a protest in Islamabad and assembled outside Lal Masjid after Friday prayers.

ASWJ head Maulana Muhammad Ludhianvi condemned the caricatures and urged the Muslim world to play a role in making international laws to discourage blasphemy. The ASWJ leaders also demanded expulsion of the French ambassador.

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Hundreds of people also came together in various parts of Faisalabad to stage a protest demonstration against the French magazine.

The protests were organised by various religious organisations, including Tehreek-e-Ahle Sunnat and Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam.  The protesters carried placards inscribed with slogans against the publication. They said they would not hesitate to sacrifice their lives to protect the honour, prestige and esteem of Prophet Muhammad (pbuh).

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Tehreek-e-Ahle Sunnat chairman Qazi Muhammad Faiz Rasool Rizvi said Western countries had conspired to incense Muslims by publishing the caricatures in an effort to alter the ideology of Islam. He said love for the Prophet (pbuh) was a basic tenet of Islam.

Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam Faisalabad president Abdus Shakoor Rizvi condemned the publication of the offensive caricatures. He said anti-Islam elements should stop hatching such conspiracies or be ready to face consequences.

Kurt Westergaard is the Danish cartoonist who drew the Mohammed exploding head bomb cartoon

Kurt Westergaard is the Danish cartoonist who drew the Mohammed exploding head bomb cartoon

Business and trade activities in the provincial capital of Balochistan came to a standstill due to a shutter-down strike called by different religious and political parties to protest against the caricatures.

The strike was jointly called by Jamaatud Dawa, Jamiat-e-Ulema Islam-Nazaryati, Jamaat-e-Islami, ASWJ, Mutheda Mahaz Balochistan and Khilji Quomi Ethad. The Anjuman-e-Tajeran, traders’ union Balochistan, also backed the strike call.

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The religious parties took out separate procession and held protest demonstrations near the Quetta Press Club.  The protestors demanded that Pakistan snap diplomatic relations with France and put pressure on international community to punish all who played with the sentiments of Muslim world.

Thousands of people took to streets on Friday in several districts of Hyderabad and Mirpurkhas divisions to protest against the French magazine. 

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 RELATED STORY:

Bounties offered on the heads of remaining Charlie Hebdo cartoonists, publishers

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GAZA Muslims are outraged (When aren’t they?) that an Israeli bookstore plans to sell Charlie Hebdo magazine

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Hey, lighten up crybabies, Charlie Hebdo mocks Jews, too. Israel’s national Steimatzky’s bookstore chain plans to add Charlie Hebdo to its magazine racks, Israel’s Ch. 2 News reported. Steimatzky announced that copies would go on sale locally as of next week.

Algemeiner (h/t Susan K)  More than 7 million copies of the latest edition of Charlie Hebdo were sold worldwide after Islamic terrorists slaughtered 12 employees in an attack on the publication’s Paris offices two weeks ago. 

In reference to Muslim fundamentalists, Mohammed sasy, "It's hard being loved by idiots

In reference to Muslim fundamentalists, the prophet Mohammed says, “It’s hard being loved by idiots

The January 14 edition features a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammed holding a sign saying, “Je Suis Charlie” (I am Charlie), with a headline above the cartoon reading, “Tout Est Pardonne” (All Is Forgiven).

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A single copy of the magazine costs 35 shekels ($8.90 USD) and the first distribution outlet is set for Ayalon Mall in Ramat Gan, next to Tel Aviv, according to the firm, which has distributed copies of the satirical magazine in the past.

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In related news – which might impact Israeli sales of the magazine either way – enraged jihadists in Gaza took to the streets on Monday to support the Islamic State terror group and condemn Charlie Hebdo.

“Today, we are telling France and world countries that while Islam orders us to respect all religions, it also orders us to punish and kill those who assault and offend Islam’s Prophet Mohammad,” protester Abu Abdallah al-Makdissi told Reuters.

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THE BEST OF CHARLIE HEBDO

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Muslims believe freedom of expression is “terrorism” and are burning down churches to prove it

imagesTypical Muslims in countries across the world are continuing to voice their outrage over the publication of images of the Paedophile Prophet Muhammad by French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.

Churches were attacked in a second day of protests in Niger and around the world, with demonstrations also held in Pakistan and the Yemeni capital, Sanaa. Pakistan’s interior minister compared the actions of those who published images offensive to Islam to those of Muslim “terrorists.” 

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PAKISTANI MUSLIM SAVAGES demand that the rest of the Charlie Hebdo cartoonists be hanged

They believe that the death sentence for blasphemy is the correct punishment for committing the worst act of terrorism ever by drawing insulting pictures of the paedophile prophet Mohammed.24B8C58000000578-2911717-image-m-12_1421335429374

UK Daily Mail  As worldwide protests continued for a second day, nearly 300 people from a religious group rallied in the eastern city of Lahore, carrying placards saying ‘Down with Charlie Hebdo’. One banner read: ‘Making blasphemy cartoon of the Prophet is the worst act of terrorism. The sketch-makers must be hanged immediately.’ 

Cartoonist Renald Luzier, who drew the image, had argued earlier this week that there should be no exceptions to freedom of expression. 

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The Lahore rally came as Pakistani lawmakers staged their own demonstrations outside parliament after passing a resolution condemning the image of Islam’s prophet in the French satirical newspaper. The front cover shows a weeping Mohammed, holding a sign reading ‘I am Charlie’ with the words ‘All is forgiven’ above him. 

Like many other Muslim nations, Pakistan has condemned last week’s deadly rampage at the office of Charlie Hebdo which killed 12 people, including editors, cartoonists and two policemen.

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But the authorities have also condemned the publication of cartoons depicting the Prophet Mohammed, which many Muslims consider sacrilege.

Religious Affairs Minister Sardar Mohammad Yousuf said the lawmakers unanimously adopted the resolution condemning the publication of the images. The minister said the resolution would be sent to all foreign missions in the country and to the United Nations, to register Pakistan’s protest against the cartoons, which ‘hurt our religious sentiments deeply.’ 

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NIGER: Muslim savages still raging over Charlie Hebdo cartoons set fire to French Cultural Center and churches, raid Christian shops

Foaming-at-the-mouth Muslim demonstrators in Niger attacked the French cultural centre, set fire to churches and raided Christian shops today, as protests erupted against Charlie Hebdo’s cartoons in several Muslim West African countries.

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As a result, NIGER has banned the distribution of Charlie Hebdo in the country over the French satirical weekly’s publication of blasphemous cartoons of Islam’s holy Prophet Muhammad. Niger’s President Mahamadou Issoufou has instructed the Niamey government to “ban the publication and sale of this issue across the country,” the statement added.

UK Daily Mail  Police in Niger’s southern city of Zinder, the second largest in Niger, fired tear gas at a crowd of hundreds of people who burned French flags and tyres in the streets on Friday. “The protesters are crying out in local Hausa language: Charlie is Satan – let hell engulf those supporting Charlie,” said Aboubacar Mamane, a shopkeeper, by telephone.

Angry Muslims burn French flag

Angry Muslims burn French flag

Witnesses said the demonstrators ransacked the French cultural centre and the homes of police officers. Demonstrators said they were angered by the latest front cover of Charlie Hebdo this week, which despite the Paris killings again featured a cartoon of Mohammad. “Charlie Hebdo in the toilets,” said one placard held by a protestor in Nouakchott.

The presidents of Niger, Mali and Senegal last week marched alongside more than a million French citizens to show solidarity with the victims of the Paris bloodshed, which began with a shooting attack on Charlie Hebdo’s Paris office.

But in an indication of the shifting mood, Macky Sall, president of one of Africa’s most stable democracies Senegal, said late on Thursday: “Freedom of the press should not, in our view, head in the direction of a totally pointless provocation.”

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ANGRY MUSLIMS (are there any other kind?) make new threats against remaining Charlie Hebdo cartoonists

Muslims stage angry protests over Charlie Hebdo’s Mohammed cartoon as Boko Haram terror leader hails Paris massacre, calling new front cover image of the prophet Mohammed a renewed insult to their religion.

The One Finger salute is a show of solidarity with ISIS terrorists

The One Finger salute is a show of solidarity with ISIS terrorists

UK Daily Mail  Charlie Hebdo’s decision to depict the Prophet Mohammed on its front cover today has angered Muslims around the world who called it a renewed insult to their religion. Around three million copies of the French satirical newspaper hit the stands this morning for the first since the terror attack on its office which killed 12 people.

The front cover showed a weeping Mohammed, holding a sign reading ‘I am Charlie’ with the words ‘All is forgiven’ above him. Such was its immediate popularity, the print run has since been increased to five million after issues sold out within minutes.

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But many Muslims believe their faith forbids depictions of the prophet and reacted with dismay – and occasionally anger – to the latest cover image.  Some felt their expressions of solidarity with Charlie Hebdo after last week’s attack had been rebuffed, while others feared the cartoon would trigger yet more violence.  

‘You’re putting the lives of others at risk when you’re taunting bloodthirsty and mad terrorists,’ said Hamad Alfarhan, a 29-year old Kuwaiti doctor.  

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In the Philippines, there were angry protests at the front cover and also the perceived double standards by the West.  Placards by demonstrators in Marawi were held aloft which accused the West of remaining silent over the deaths of Muslims and that said ‘You are Charlie, I love Mohammed’.

In one rally a picture of the Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, was set on fire and banners waved that declared there would be no apology from the Islamic world for the Paris massacre.  Mr Netanyahu became a central figure in the response to the attacks after four Jewish shoppers were killed by one of the Islamic fanatics at a kosher deli the day after the Charlie Hebdo shootings.

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It came as Nigerian extremist group Boko Haram hailed the Paris massacres. ‘We are indeed happy with what happened in France,’ the group’s leader Abubakar Shekau said in a video posted online. ‘We are happy over what befell the people of France… as their blood was shed inside their country as they (try to) safeguard their blood,’ he said. 

Meanwhile, Abbas Shumann, deputy to the Grand Sheik of Cairo’s influential Al-Azhar mosque, said the new image was ‘a blatant challenge to the feelings of Muslims who had sympathised with this newspaper.’ 

In Jordan, the Muslim Brotherhood said it would stage a protest after Friday prayers in Amman in response to the paper’s Mohammed cartoon. Spokesman Murad Adaileh said the brotherhood strongly condemned both the killings and the ‘offensive’ against the prophet.

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That was a widely expressed sentiment.  Ghassan Nhouli, a grocer in the Lebanese port city of Sidon, said the magazine and the killers ‘are both wrong.’ ‘It is not permitted to kill and also it is not permitted to humiliate a billion Muslims,’ he said. 

Meanwhile, Al Qaeda in Yemen claimed responsibility for the deadly attack on Charlie Hebdo, saying it was ordered by the jihadist network’s global chief to avenge the French magazine’s cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed.

In a video entitled ‘A message regarding the blessed battle of Paris’, Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) said that it had financed and plotted the assault on the weekly that left 12 people dead and shocked France. 

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But it said the orders had come from the very top of the global jihadist network – Ayman al-Zawahiri, the Egyptian doctor who succeeded Al Qaeda founder Osama bin Laden after his death in 2011.

‘We, Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, claim responsibility for this operation as vengeance for the messenger of Allah,’ Nasser al-Ansi, one of AQAP’s chiefs, said in the video. 

Leading Algerian militant Mokhtar Belmokhtar, formerly a member of Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), praised the ‘heroic and rare attack’ in France, hailing the Kouachi brothers as ‘two soldiers of Islam… who humiliated France.’ France ‘thought that it was immune to the strikes of the mujahedeen,’ he said in a statement. 

YOUTUBE has removed the video but if you click the Daily Mail link at top, you can see it there.

 

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#IamNOTcharlie: Exposing its fury over global support for Charlie Hebdo, leaked Al-Jazeera emails order its journalists to slam the cartoonists

TRANSLATION: "I am NOT Charlie"

TRANSLATION: “I am NOT Charlie”

As journalists worldwide reacted with universal revulsion at the massacre of some of their own by Islamic jihadists in Paris, Al Jazeera English editor and executive producer Salah-Aldeen Khadr sent out a staff-wide email, advising them to condemn the Charlie Hebdo cartoonists, not their assassins.

National Review  “Please accept this note in the spirit it is intended — to make our coverage the best it can be,” the London-based Khadr wrote Thursday, in the first of a series of internal emails leaked to National Review Online. “We are Al Jazeera!”

Khadr urged his employees to ask if this was “really an attack on ‘free speech,’” discuss whether “I am Charlie” is an “alienating slogan,” caution viewers against “making this a free speech aka ‘European Values’ under attack binary [sic],” and portray the attack as “a clash of extremist fringes.”

“Defending freedom of expression in the face of oppression is one thing; insisting on the right to be obnoxious and offensive just because you can is infantile,” Khadr wrote. “Baiting extremists isn’t bravely defiant when your manner of doing so is more significant in offending millions of moderate people as well.

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And within a climate where violent response—however  illegitimate —is a real risk, taking a goading stand on a principle virtually no one contests is worse than pointless: it’s pointlessly all about you.”

His denunciation of Charlie Hebdo’s publication of cartoons mocking the prophet Mohammed didn’t sit well with some Al Jazeera English employees.

Hours later, U.S.-based correspondent Tom Ackerman sent an email quoting a paragraph from a New York Times’ January 7 column by Ross Douthat. The op-ed argued that cartoons like the ones that drove the radical Islamists to murder must be published, “because the murderers cannot be allowed for a single moment to think that their strategy can succeed.”

That precipitated an angry backlash from the network’s Qatar-based correspondents, revealing in the process a deep cultural rift at a network once accused of overt anti-Western bias.

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“I guess if you insult 1.5 billion people chances are one or two of them will kill you,” wrote Mohamed Vall Salem, who reported for Al Jazeera’s Arab-language channel before joining its English wing in 2006. “And I guess if you encourage people to go on insulting 1.5 billion people about their most sacred icons then you just want more killings because as I said in 1.5 billion there will remain some fools who don’t abide by the laws or know about free speech.” [sic]

“What Charlie Hebdo did was not free speech it was an abuse of free speech in my opinion, go back to the cartoons and have a look at them!” Salem later wrote. “It’s not about what the drawing said, it was about how they said it. I condemn those heinous killings, but I’M NOT CHARLIE.”

That prompted BBC alum Jacky Rowland — now Al Jazeera English’s senior correspondent in Paris — to email a “polite reminder” to her colleague: “#journalismsinotacrime.”

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But her response triggered a furious reaction from another of the network’s Arab correspondents. “First I condemn the brutal killing,” wrote Omar Al Saleh, a “roving reporter” currently on assignment in Yemen. “But I AM NOT CHARLIE.”

“JOURNALISM IS NOT A CRIME [but] INSULTISM IS NOT JOURNALISM,” he raged. “AND NOT DOING JOURNALISM PROPERLY IS A CRIME.”

The heated back-and-forth illustrates Al Jazeera English’s precarious balance between its Arab center of gravity and the Western correspondents it employs. After being accused for years of fomenting anti-Western sentiment, most damningly by some of its own anchors, the network made a concerted effort to rebrand, hiring a slew American and European reporters — especially those who had trouble getting jobs in their own domestic markets.

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ABU DHABI: Muslims outraged at Selena Gomez for showing her ankle in a mosque

OFF WITH HER HEAD? Pop starlet Selena Gomez has been heavily criticized after posting pictures of herself flashing her ankle inside Abu Dhabi’s Grand Mosque on her Instragram account.

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UK Daily Mail  A second picture, showing Gomez and fellow musicians Kendall Jenner, Gigi Hadid, Cody Simpson and Shay Mitchell smiling and striking poses has also been lambasted.

Mosque visiting rules strictly ban all ‘intimate behaviour’ including holding hands and kissing, and states that all skirts must be ankle-length.  

This image showing Selena alongside Kendall Jenner, Gigi Hadid, Cody Simpson and Shay Mitchell also drew fury from Instagram users, who branded it 'disrespectful'

This image showing Selena alongside Kendall Jenner, Gigi Hadid, Cody Simpson and Shay Mitchell also drew fury from Instagram users, who branded it ‘disrespectful’

Commenting on the picture, Alaa Almitwally said: ‘Disrecpectful! It’s a religion place not a place to have fun in, so disappointed.’ Meanwhile another user, Ayisha Elturk, said: ‘If their intent was to learn about Islam they wouldn’t be posing like they were standing outside and amusement park. ‘I like Selena Gomez but to have her do something like this makes me no longer a fan.’

Also raising eyebrows and ire in Dubai, Kendall Jenner of the infamous Kardashian klan swaps hijab for a bikini on tour of United Arab Emirates with Hollywood’s new brat pack.

UK Daily Mail  Kendall Jenner has posted a racy bikini selfie while on tour of the United Arab Emirates. The 19-year-old reality star and model posed up in a skimpy brown two-piece while in a Dubai hotel and shared the snap with her Instagram fans on New Year’s Eve.  She captioned the picture: ‘Dubyeeee 2014.’

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It was a return to form for the rising supermodel, who was among a group of young Hollywood stars who donned traditional abayas and hijabs while visiting the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in Abu Dhabi on Monday.  

Not their typical look: Kendall (far right) Selena Gomez (middle with hands together) and friends covered up in abayas and hijabs for a visit to the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in Abu Dhabi on Monday.

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Kendall was joined by Gigi Hadid, Selena Gomez, Shay Mitchell, Victoria’s Secret model Devon Windsor and Gigi’s singer boyfriend Cody Simpson for their first tourist stop during their New Year’s Eve holiday week. 

The mosque, which is the largest in the United Arab Emirates, can accommodate as many as 40,000 people. The tradition is Sunni Islam and the mosque is the key place of worship on Friday gathers and Eid prayers.

Jenner, Hadid, Gomez and their friends were dressed in customary UAE clothes including long black robes and scarves to cover most of their faces.

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The Grand Mosque has caused problems for celebrities in the past, with controversial star Rihanna thrown out after posing for pictures inside the compound. 

Celebrity visitors such as Rihanna – who took glamorous photos in front of the mosque in 2013 – have been criticized in the past for violating the rules on the ‘status and sanctity of the mosque.’

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Staff ejected the Bermudian singer after complaining she did not have permission to carry out a photoshoot while dressed head-to-toe in a black jumpsuit.

Justifying their decision, workers at the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque said Rihanna’s actions had not been in keeping with the ‘sanctity’ of the site. 

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