New Muslim threat to Britain as hate preacher, Anjem Choudary, recruits vigilante squads

anjem-choudary_1202923cMUSLIM hate preacher Anjem Choudary is backing a Muslim group that stood accused last night of stoking vigilante violence on Britain’s streets. Welfare parasite Choudary is urging his followers to sign up as recruits to the newly-launched Islamic Emergency Defence — which vows to create a network of “task forces” to redress wrongs and mete out instant justice. And last night the group was accused of mocking Britain’s war dead — just by its initials.

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The Sun (h/t Maria J) The Islamic Emergency Defence’s name shortens to IED, which also stands for Improvised Explosive Device — the kind of deadly bomb used to kill and injure soldiers in Afghanistan and Iraq. Backers of the group, which is further accused of risking vigilante violence, claimed it was “pure coincidence.”

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But ex-Scotland Yard commander and terrorism expert John O’Connor fumed: “This is mocking Servicemen killed by IEDs. It shows their warped state of mind.” The group’s launch comes just a month after Army drummer Lee Rigby was hacked to death in Woolwich, south-east London.

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Its website gives an “emergency hotline” mobile number for Muslims to report attacks rather than calling the police. It offers a link to set up “task forces” and says issues will be “dealt with in a swift and Islamic manner.”

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The website is headed by a militaristic lion surrounded by the slogan, “Defending the Muslim community”. Hate cleric Choudary greeted the IED’s arrival by tweeting “Good news with the launch”, and saying that it had “risen to the challenge”.

Organisers, who “clarified” on Twitter that Choudary did not run the group, admitted their hotline had quickly been swamped by abusive calls. Shadow justice secretary Sadiq Khan said: “What is hoped to be achieved by this except offence and tension?”

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Labour MP Rushanara Ali said: “When groups encourage people to take the law into their own hands it needs to be stopped.” The Home Office vowed to keep IED “under review”.

The London-based lawyer turned cleric, who lives off taxpayer-funded welfare because he refused to practice law, admitted to having an “advisory role” in the group. Asked if it was encouraging violence, he said: “People can look at it as a vigilante group but to protect and defend yourself is not illegal.”

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